Noah Webster, Jr., letter to William D Williamson, May 6, 1837, page 1

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Noah Webster, Jr., letter to William D Williamson, May 6, 1837, page 1


New Haven May 6th 1837

Dear Sir,

In reply to your inquiries, I would
remark, that in the common schools with which
I was acquainted, & in which I received my earliest
instruction, the books used were Thomas Dilworth’s
Spelling Book; a Primer, a Psalter or the Bible. I do
not recollect any other book for reading. Fenning’s Spelling
Book was in the country, but was not used in my neighborhood.
What books were used before Dilworth’s I do
not know. Perry’s Spelling Book & dictionary began
to be used, if I recollect right, about the time that
I firsts published my Grammatical Institute or
soon after. I have not the means of determining this
point.

My Spelling Book, a first part of Grammatical Institute
was published in 1783; the grammar, or second
part in 1784. The third Part, I believe, in that or the
year following. Of the precise number of My Spelling
Books published, I have no account; but from the
returns of the publishers for more than 30 years
part, it is probable the whole number is at least
15 million, My Grammar & Third Part passed
through many editions, but what numbers were published
I am unable to say.

The grammar in Dilworth was the only one I knew, till
Lowth’s appeared. This was printed by Robert Aitken


Author

Noah Webster, Jr.
Manuscript title
Date
May 6, 1837
Size
x cm x xcm; x in x x in
Penmanship Style
Collection
Boston Public Library
File name
Noah Webster, Jr. 1758-001-001-
Links related to Noah Webster, Jr.
Noah Webster, Jr., Wikipedia [1]
A grammatical institute of the English language, comprising an easy, concise, and systematic method of education, designed for the use of English schools in America. In three parts. [2]
A grammatical institute of the English language, comprising a easy, concise, and systematic method of education, designed for the use of English schools in America. In three parts, part II containing a plain and comprehensive grammar, grounded on the true principles and idioms of the language by Noah Webster. [3]

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